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DIY Cornhole Board Plans

Brought to you by Lowe's Creative Ideas

Learn how to make cornhole boards as a weekend project and then challenge your family and friends to some outdoor fun. Set these regulation-size boards on your lawn, deck, or patio and then fold them for easy storage afterward.

Backyard DIY cornhole board with colorful beanbags.

Project Overview

Skill Level

Intermediate

Estimated Time

1 day

Estimated Cost

$$$$$

Tools & Materials

Tools

  • Table saw or portable circular saw and straightedge
  • Miter saw
  • Jigsaw fitted with a fine-tooth wood-cutting blade
  • Electric drill/driver with drill bits, countersink and driver bit
  • Tape rule
  • Circle compass
  • Clamps
  • Waterproof wood glue

Materials

  • See Project Diagram for lumber required to build two game boards.
  • 1-1/4-in deck screws
  • 2-in deck screws
  • 4 - 1/4-in x 2-in hex-head bolts
  • 12 - 1/4-in flat washers
  • 4 - 1/4-in locknuts
  • Exterior sealer/stain and paint

Items may be Special Order in some stores. Product costs, availability, and item numbers may vary online or by market. Paint colors may vary slightly from those shown. Availability varies by market for lumber species and sizes.

Missing anything? Shop Online

Instructions

The Cutting List and Cutting Diagram in the Project Diagram show the materials required to build two beanbag toss boards.

Build the Deck

Step 1

Fasten rails between the game board sides.

Cut the sides (A) and rails (B) to length (Project Diagram, Cutting List, Cutting Diagram). Drill countersink pilot holes in the sides and glue and screw together two frames (Project Diagram, Drawing 1).

Good to Know

Where the screw holes are very close to the ends of the parts, drilling countersunk pilot holes prevents splitting when driving the screws.

Step 2

Measure the length and width of the frames (A/B). From 1/2-inch plywood, cut the tops (C) to fit (Project Diagram, Cutting List). Mark a center point for the deck hole and draw a 6-inch-diameter circle on each top (Project Diagram, Drawing 1). Drill a 3/8-inch hole just inside each circle and jigsaw the holes.

Step 3

Fasten the game board top to the frame.

Drill countersunk pilot holes around the perimeter of each top (C), 3/8 inch from the edges (Project Diagram, Drawing 1). Apply glue to the top edges of the frames and position the tops on the frames. Drive 1-1/4-inch deck screws.

Make the Leg Assemblies

Step 1

Draw a 1-1/4-in radius on the end of each game board leg.

Cut the legs (D), stretchers (E) and braces (F) to length (Project Diagram, Cutting List). Cut the 11-degree angle on one end of each leg. Mark the center point on the width of the board 1-1/4 inches from the end and draw the 1-1/4-inch radius on the other end of each leg (Project Diagram, Drawing 2). Round off the ends of the legs with a jigsaw.

Step 2

Drill two countersunk pilot holes through each leg (Project Diagram, Drawing 2). Screw the pairs of legs to the stretchers (E).

Step 3

Glue and screw the brace to each legs/stretcher assembly.

Drill countersunk screw holes in the braces (F). Fasten each to a legs/stretcher assembly with the top edge of the braces and top face of the stretcher flush (Project Diagram, Drawing 2).

Assemble the Game Boards

Step 1

Drill a pivot hole through the game board side.

With the game boards upside down, position a leg assembly inside each target frame at the upper end (Project Diagram, Drawing 3). Place 1/8-inch-thick shims between the edges of the legs (D) and the bottom face of each top (C). With the rounded ends of the legs barely touching the rails (B), clamp one leg to one side (A) of each frame. Using the hole in the leg as a guide, drill a 1/4-inch hole through the side. Unclamp the leg and clamp the other leg to the opposite side of each frame. Drill the second hole.

Step 2

If you wish to paint and/or stain your targets, it is easier to do so before attaching the legs. We finished all the parts with an exterior sealer/stain (Rustic Cedar shown) and gave the tops an additional decorative treatment with exterior paint applied in stripes masked off with painter’s tape.

Step 3

With the finish dry, attach the leg assemblies to the sides with bolts, flat washers and locknuts (Project Diagram, Drawing 3). Avoid overtightening the locknuts to let the legs swing freely open and closed.

Set Up Your Game Boards

Step 1

From a durable fabric such as duck canvas, sew four 6-inch x 6-inch bags in the color of your choice. Then sew another four bags in a contrasting color. Fill each bag with 15-16 ounces of hard corn kernels or a synthetic substitute of roughly the same density. Then sew the open seams closed.

Step 2

Place the boards on a flat surface with the front edges 27 feet apart. If you only have one game board, mark a throw line 27 feet from the front edge of the board. Standing at the throw line or to one side of a game board, each player is allowed four tosses, alternating between players.

Step 3

Games can be scored as you like for informal play, or according to the rules of competition

These beanbag toss games are fun for informal backyard play but sized for regulation contests. --Lowe’s Creative Ideas

Explore more ideas for outdoor entertaining:

Game-Day Patio Gathering Space

12 DIY Outdoor Games

Outdoor Kitchen Plan